By Hand: Grocery Lists

In a recent post, I talked about my love of sketchnotes and visual note taking. I am like, OB-sessed with practicing my handwriting every chance I get. I found handwritten grocery lists to be a great way of exercising these skills, and have collected some that I’ve done in the past few months for you below.

For each list, I tried to practice a different visual element each time: using images in place of words; writing text in all-caps or all lower-case; cursive/scroll print; block letters; bullets; and frames/containers (frames and containers are shapes that surround a word/words in your notes). You can learn more about sketchnote practice in Sunni Brown’s super-helpful-webinar-series-on-visual note taking or in this post by Craighton Berman.

Sketchnote of grocery list items

Grocery list sketchnote; text and icons practice.

Sketchnote of grocery list items

Grocery sketchnote; practicing all-caps, alignment, and bullet points.

Sketchnote of grocery list items

Grocery list sketchnote practice of various “typefaces”.

Sketchnote of grocery list items

Grocery list sketchnote study of various “typefaces”; this one’s a little lazy :-)

Sketchnote of grocery list items

Grocery sketchnote; practicing handwritten fonts and some icon doodles.

Sketchnote of grocery list items

Grocery list sketchnote study of various “typefaces”.

Sketchnote of grocery list items

Grocery list sketchnote; text and icons practice.

Sketchnote of grocery list items

Grocery list sketchnote; practicing text styles and containers (i.e., enclosing words in shapes to emphasis them).

Sketchnote of grocery list items

Grocery list sketchnote practice of various “typefaces”.

Sketchnote of grocery list items

Grocery list sketchnote using (mostly) images/icons to capture the needed grocery items.

Sketchnote of grocery list items

Grocery list sketchnote study of various “typefaces”, plus an icon drawn by my hubby.

Sketchnote of grocery list items

Grocery list sketchnote; practicing containers (i.e., enclosing words in shapes to emphasis them).

Now that I’ve discovered the AnyList app, I’m no longer handwriting my grocery lists (if you’re a list-maker, you seriously need to check out that app!) but I definitely plan on continuing to practice sketchnotes :-)!

How do you practice your sketchnote skills? Let me know in the comments below!

I *heart* sketchnotes

I was first introduced to sketchnotes in 2012, at the ASTD Conference in Denver. Since then, I’ve completely delved into the world of visual thinking with fervor and I have to say: it’s f-ing awesome! I use every opportunity I can to practice my sketchnotes and today I want to share with you a couple I drew up the other day during Dan Roam’s presentation on vivid thinking.

Sketchnotes are notes that capture information through the use of both images AND text, similar to a comic book strip, except you arrange the content in a way that makes the most sense to you. When you look back at them, they serve as a better reminder of what happened than your typical text-only notes. The reason they’re so memorable is because our brain is geared to process images extremely well.

For this sketch note, I used a 5 x 7 Neuland sketchbook and a Sharpie Ultra Fine Point permanent marker.

SketchnoteSketchnote

I then scanned the drawings and colored them in using my new Wacom Intous tablet and Sketchbook Express.

Sketchnote edited with Wacom Intuos Sketchnote edited with Wacom Intuos

Do you ever sketchnote? What do you like about visual notes? Share your thoughts below!

Learn more about Sketchnotes here and more about why doodling matters here