Sketch Block is Everywhere

I *heart* typefaces. I especially heart handwritten typefaces and one in particular has been popping up a bunch over the past few months – it’s called Sketch Block and it is EVERYwhere!

Lukas Bischoff designed the typeface in 2009. It’s no surprise that Sketch Block is a popular font – it’s fun, slightly whimsical, and yet, unlike some other handwritten styles, it’s super easy-to-read.

Today, I’ve gathered some Sketch Block sightings for your viewing pleasure – check them out below!

Sketch Block on Asher Roth album cover

Sketch Block on album cover

Example of Sketch Block in a concept design for a non-profit website

Sketch Block used in a website concept

Example of Sketch Block in a concept design for a non-profit website

Sketch Block used in a website concept

Final design for non-profit website header using Sketch font

Sketch Block used in website header

An example of Sketch Block from Pinterest

Sketch Block used in a DIY tutorial from Sarah Scoop

An example of Sketch Block font in an NPR website ad

Sketch Block in ad on NPR’s website

An example of Sketch Block font in an NPR website ad

Sketch Block in ad on NPR’s website

An example of Sketch Block on Nature Valley packaging

Sketch Block on packaging

An example of Sketch Block on Nature Valley packaging

Sketch Block on packaging

Sketch Block Typeface used on packaging

Sketch Block Typeface used on packaging

Sketch Block Typeface used on packaging

Sketch Block Typeface used on craft tool packaging

Typeface similar to Sketch Block Typeface; used on ketchup bottle packaging

Typeface similar to Sketch Block Typeface; used on ketchup bottle packaging.

Sketch Block font on a magazine cover

Sketch Block font on a magazine cover

Logo Design

Recently, I submitted a logo design for a contest at work held by a new employee-run organization called Healthy HCPF. Healthy HCPF was started with the intentions of motivating the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing’s employees to live healthier by promoting healthy activities and practices at work. It’s a good idea; people spend the majority of their time at work surrounded by coworkers and I’ve read that weight gain and weight loss is heavily influenced by the people in your environment (http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1649321,00.html).

Healthy HCPF’s committee didn’t specify what they were looking for in the logo. I did a couple rounds of ideations, some on paper but most on Illustrator. I decided to go with a heart image as my “healthy” image because it’s simple and easy to read.


The Department’s current logo looks like this:

I chose to mimic the “C” that already exists in the Department’s logo and in the Colorado State Flag. I also chose to stick with the colors that are in the Department logo: red, green, yellow, dark blue and light blue. Here are some refined concept ideations:

Red and green obviously look too similar to Christmas colors. Dark blue and red reminded me of an adolescent boy’s room; yellow and either of the blues looked okay but yellow can be hard to read so I shy away from using large amounts of yellow in a logo; green and either of the blues looked too masculine for my taste. My favorite color combo ended up being the light blue and red. I know red can be seen as “blood” or “danger” but it can also refer to “life” and “health” depending on the shade of red and it’s context. Since the “C” I was mimicking is already red, I chose to make the rest of the letters in “HCPF” red as well. Light blue for the word “healthy” added a more feminine touch. I had a tough time deciding whether or not to make the word “healthy” and the letters “HCPF” lower cased or upper cased. Here is the final logo:

I am interested in hearing any feedback you may have on this logo.

Trade Deficit

There are a series of sculptures along Broadway from Blake to Lawrence made from salvaged storage containers stacked on top of one another. I used to drive by them every morning on my way to work and every afternoon on the way home. After doing a little internet research I found one article about the sculptures which included info on the artist and title of the piece: Trade Deficit.

There are 3 sculptures in the series. One is small, one is medium and one is large. By large I mean large; it shoots straight up into the sky and is hard to miss from any direction. Each sculpture has a 5-year anti-graffiti coat on it; an essential feature in this part of town.

The medium size sculpture is the one I find most interesting. It has an interactive element that the other two don’t; each and every day it is used by people in this city. I took some pictures that illustrate.

If you’re interested in learning more about the artist, Joseph Riché, and the Denver Public Art Program, visit the Denver Office of Cultural Affairs:  http://www.denvergov.org/Welcome/tabid/392922/Default.aspx

Here are some more pictures for fun:

The Denver Diet

Growing up as a fat kid wasn’t exactly a piece of cake. Being somewhat kinesthetically challenged (a.k.a. – clumsy) I preferred reading over playing outside and it wasn’t until puberty hit that I finally lost some of my childhood chub. Not until my college years, however did I finally start becoming active on a regular basis.

My first year in the Mile High City was the adjusting year. A mixture of stress and homesickness caused a yo-yo effect on my diet and ultimately my weight. I would use food as a coping mechanism. After that first year I moved downtown where, parking being the bitch that it is, it proved much easier to walk rather than drive. I was forced to walk more – to school, food, stores, friend’s apartments, EVERYwhere. The local restaurants also offer food that is less greasy and smaller in portion size than what is offered in San Antonio therefore reducing my normal calorie intake.

Those lifestyle changes are what helped me lose the weight I had gained the first year in college and what helps me continue to keep the weight off. When I go home to visit, people ask me what it is that  I’ve done to lose so much weight. It almost seems too simple when I say “walk more/eat less” but it’s true. Now, if only it were that easy to help cities like San Antonio tackle and overcome their obesity problems. Maybe there is an easy way?